Friday, February 20, 2015

AIRBRUSH -- NOT FOR SISSIES!

Have any of you readers ever used a compressor and an
airbrush? It's not easy, in my experience!
 
Either the nozzle clogs repeatedly or there's another problem with the air pressure or the air supply. I know the paint has to be thin, and I also know that everything must be very well cleaned after each use. I've never used canned air...is that easier?
 
I've had graininess or "orange peeling" -- common with acrylics drying so fast. Beginners often have "spiders" because they aren't moving their hand soon enough or at the end of a stroke.
 
I became so frustrated that I sold my equipment and haven't done another airbrush piece since. But I came upon this example from earlier (below) and invite any of you readers to get in touch with me if you wish to showcase your own airbrush pieces.
 
I know, it's very formally balanced.
 
 

Thursday, February 12, 2015

CHIC-ER SNEAKERS - COLORFUL & TRENDY!

THIS POST IS A DEPARTURE,
BUT ONE MIGHT CALL IT ALTERED ART.
 
I bought a plain, white, very inexpensive pair of tennis, and didn't even wash them first.
Should have, I suppose, but too excited to DO this!
P.Guhin, tutorial
I used fluid acrylic inks and paints, which are of course permanent when dry.
decorative, Guhin
I did not use the mossy green at all.
Then I gathered my small paint brushes and--oh joy, what a blast painting the random shapes!
tutorial, P.Guhin
I used primary colors.
art, activity, Guhin
Yes, I will actually wear these!
Guhin 


 

Saturday, February 7, 2015

CAMOUFLAGE AND COLLAGE


Disguise an object, blend it into the background,
for a truly cool effect. Fool the eye!

Painters have used paint brushes
(see the top piece at this link)
and other objects in a manner similar to this idea.
Be creative with camouflage. It’s an exercise in disguise!

camouflage, mixed-media
Make a statement with your art!
YOU WILL NEED:

  • A map, comics, poster, wrapping paper…even print fabric adhered to a sturdy surface. Cover the background. TIP: Choose a pattern that you will want to duplicate yourself.
  • A lightweight toy plane,  car, figure, animal, utensil, any smallish object that’s somewhat flat (low relief). Perhaps similar to or in keeping with the pattern you chose, OR you could go the opposite way (a snake in the beautiful garden, or a rubber knife on a background of images of harmless toys, for example).
  • TIP: Use sandpaper to rough up slippery plastic items.
  • Gesso the small object and, when dry, paint it to match the background. Place the (dry) object where it will eventually be glued, and mimic the parts of the pattern that are underneath, with paint. I.e., your goal is to camouflage the object and fool the viewer’s eye—at least from a distance! Seal with a clear coat when the painting on the object is finished.
  • Then adhere the low relief object, using a very strong adhesive such as heavy gel medium.
P.Guhin, copyrighted
When not viewed at an angle, the doll blends in much better.
Thanks for your interest in this project! - Paula
 
 

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

A FOLLOWER WAS KIND ENOUGH TO SEND ME AN ARTWORK PHOTO

I was inspired this morning by an email from a wonderful gal, Vivian Miller, who tried a product I endorsed here and in a book, bless her heart. She sent a photo: 
Vivian+Miller, original
Vivian's first time using Brusho!
Brusho is made in Great Britain, but is beginning to be better known in the US as well. I don't believe Vivian's piece is finished, but what a great start! Pretty cool just as it is.
call, entries


Saturday, January 31, 2015

AGAIN WITH THE FLAT SHAPES, BUT DIFFERENT!

Just as last week's post used a layer of paint to
define shapes, you will create flat layers of color
with this painting method too!
I won't lie to you...you must be patient to try this with a fairly
complex design, but the results can be very pleasing.
how-to, acrylic, paint
I used a complementary color scheme of orange and blue.
First, choose a limited palette with no more than 5 different values.
Rules are made to be broken, of course, but 4 or 5 tints and shades
are my suggestion. They should probably range from very light to
very dark, but again that's up to you.

I wanted white in my painting, so painted the entire canvas with
white first, and let dry. For my subject matter I considered
dancing figures, which would be terrific for this project,
but went with the branching trees instead.

Select a motif that you wish to repeat, and begin with the lightest color, as I did with the pale peach trees at the right, above. Never mind the peach in the background...that comes last!
Next, I painted in the two orange trees (note how one overlaps a peach tree a bit), then the deep blue ones, and finally the dark brown trees. Let dry between colors, and do some overlapping to add interest and tie everything together.

Finally, carefully, fill in the flat negative spaces. (Youngsters--heck, even semi-oldsters!--may not have the motor skills for this.)
                                         THANKS FOR VIEWING THIS POST!



Saturday, January 24, 2015

A STENCILED EFFECT...BUT NOT!

HOW TO CREATE A POSITIVE/NEGATIVE PAINTING
In just three or four steps!
First up, the original mixed-media piece on canvas, which I rather despised and wanted to paint over. (See my post here about putting a bird on it!) 
collage, painting, bird
I love nature, but not this collage/painting.
Step 1: Disguise the original work in places with fairly thin acrylic colors, almost at random. Let dry.   
how-to, tutorial
As you can see, I flipped the piece upside-down.




TIP: For partially obscuring the piece, choose colors on either the light or the dark side, depending on the next color, in the next step!

Step 2: Draw outlines of the flat shapes you wish to use. (I selected plant forms, but other ideas include still life objects, simplified people-shapes, animals, and more. I "drew" with thin blue-violet paint and a liner brush (far better than pencil). Note where I began to fill in the negative space in two corners.

Guhin, art+blog
TIP: Turn the canvas as you work.

Step 3: Paint the negative
spaces (those around the
positive shapes). If your
background is quite dark
over all, try a very light
color (a high value)
instead of doing as I did.

In the finished painting, below, I
left a few streaks and round shapes
unpainted in the background, to add to the foliage effect.

tutorial, acrylics,
The finished positive/negative painting.










Saturday, January 17, 2015

MORE ART PRODUCTS & EFFECTS ON A WET SURFACE

In the previous post here, you'll find visual texture effects and more on watercolor paper. Today we'll use the same type of watercolor paper to experiment dry-on-wet with a number of waterbased products. If paper becomes too dry, re-spray with water as needed.

art+blog, Guhin
Water soluble art media
Scrape dry pigment from color sticks with a knife, or rub the color over rough sandpaper. As you'll learn, I only had really good luck with the latter with one of the  the above water-soluble materials. (But that's just me.)

#1 is Cretacolor wax crayons with
knife scrapings onto a wet strip.

#2 is Portfolio water soluble oil
pastels (LOVE THEM!)
art, tute, tutorial
The last two are my favorite effects here.


#3 is Weber Costello WaterCrayons...
do they even make them anymore?


#4, I used Crayola Watercolor
Colored Pencils for a
fine, misty effect
in water.


#5 was done with shavings of
Neocolor II Watersolubles.

And do try dropping dry
crystals and concentrates
on damp paper.
Order it here!
 Brusho is still my all-time
"bombastic" product for
a strong pigment on
a wet surface...it blooms
beautifully! Love it! See Dyes
in Dry Form in my book,
CREATING DECORATIVE
PAPER


art+blog
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